Five Ways to Fast-Track Your Promotion

This article, by former GE CEO Jack Welch originally appeared on LinkedIn

By Jack and Suzy Welch

Who isn’t impatient to get ahead? According to a recent national workforce survey conducted by IPSOS, a global market research firm, and the Jack Welch Management Institute, 31 percent of American professionals said they have been passed over for a promotion they felt they deserved and 43 percent thought about quitting their jobs in the past year, due to frustrations at work and limited opportunity for advancement.

And while promotions can sometimes be limited by the growth of your organization and other factors outside of your control, there are always certain things you can do (and make an effort not to do) to accelerate yours.

Obviously, the only surefire way to move up in the organization is to consistently deliver great results and deliver them the right way. But here are some additional tips to think about that have the power to help you to stand apart and get in the running – fast – so that the next promotion that comes around doesn’t pass you by:

Over-Deliver.

What does that mean?  Whenever your boss gives you an assignment or asks you to figure something out, he or she usually already has a pretty good idea of what the answer is. For example, if your manager wants you to confirm that the market share of one of the division’s products is 35% and you go out and do the work only to come back with “Yes, you’re right, it is 35%”, that isn’t over-delivering. It’s just doing what you were assigned.

But guess what? School is the only place where you get an A if you do exactly what you’re asked.  Work isn’t like that.  To over-deliver, you’ve got to redefine the assignment, make it bigger, and open your boss’s eyes to a larger horizon.

Don’t underestimate the incredible power of positive surprises. If you come back with something that’s truly eye-opening and presents a new opportunity, your superiors are going to remember it for a long, long time. In the example above, for instance, if you came back defining your market share within a larger market definition that no one had thought about before – that spells opportunity… And nothing will serve your promotion ambitions better than making your boss look smarter to his or her leadership.

Don’t Make Your Boss Play Defense.

No matter where you work, your boss has a certain wonderful thing called political capital in the organization that he or she has earned over the years by getting results and being a good team player. The last thing he or she wants to do is use it up on you – especially if you want a promotion. If someone has to come to your defense because you’ve done something stupid or careless — you’ve upset the client or you’ve been late a few times, you are using up political capital. If you ask your coworkers to cover for you, you are using up political capital.  And if your boss finds him or herself forced to say things like “Please cut Mary a break because she’s really a good employee; she’s just having some problems with her dog, okay?”, you’re definitely using up political capital.

That usually works precisely one time and then it gets very old.  So, pick that time very wisely, once every five years.  ­

Love Everyone.

When you’re gunning for a promotion, you often start being very, very loving to the people above you – it’s just what happens.  And as you spend all of your time tap dancing for the powers that be, you might tend to forget the people who work alongside you and below you and start to ignore them.  That’s ugly. Nobody likes it.  In fact, even the people in power probably take note and are grossed out by this behavior.

Now, a little bit of boss-handling is always par for the game.  “How was your vacation?”, “Understand your son scored two touchdowns on Saturday… Nice going.” Fine — everyone does that sort of thing.  But you have to go beyond kissing up and also show some love to your coworkers and people who are subordinate to you. Get to know them as human beings. Find what you authentically like about each one of them — not just in your immediate group but in the whole organization.  And yes, it really has to come from a place of authenticity — this is not something that can be phony because people can sense that right away. Yuck.

Just remember the path to your promotion is paved with big love, that’s real, and in every direction.

Volunteer for Tough Duty.

Every once in a while, a boss comes along with an assignment that nobody wants. A risky new initiative. A new job that involves working overnight.  The customer with the bad personality that everyone avoids representing. These kinds of risky or unpleasant assignments that no one wants are actually a great opportunity for you to raise your hand and really get out of the pile. You may not succeed at them, but you will get points just for putting yourself out there and saying, “I’ll take the risk. I’ll do it.”

Take those tough assignments just to get yourself on the radar — even if you have to hold your nose while you do it.  It could end up being the best career move you ever make.

Seek Mentors… Everywhere.

Look, everybody wants a mentor.  Under the right circumstances, having a mentor can be great.  Just remember one thing.  You’re limiting yourself greatly if you think you have to look to a single person as your mentor. Everyone’s a mentor, everyone.  Every person you know knows something that you don’t know — alongside you, up, down, and sideways. People in other companies. People you read about in the newspaper… Everyone.

So if your definition of mentoring is too narrow, redefine it to make everyone your mentor and soak up all the insights, ideas and best practices that live all around you. You’ll be so much smarter for it.

Ultimately, these five “extras” are no substitute for delivering solid results, all the time. But if you wake up every day thinking about how to supercharge your performance with them, it will be very tough for your organization to ignore you for long.

Leaders & Leadership | thoughts from GE’s CEO Jeff Immelt

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The General Electric company is consistently recognized as an excellent breeding ground for future business leaders. So much so, that many of the current Fortune 500 leaders today rotated through GE doors before they became CEO. Jim McNerney, Chairman & CEO of Boeing, came from GE. Bob Nardelli, ex-CEO of Home Depot and Chrysler as well. So did David Cote, CEO of Honeywell. The list goes on.

The only other institution with such a reputation is Harvard.

“Firms led by CEOs who were trained at GE will outperform firms led by CEOs who were not; GE’s reputation for developing CEO talent is, in fact, well deserved and not mere hype; and GE appears to develop more CEO talent than other noted CEO talent-generating firms.” – Ivey Business Journal

So when GE’s CEO Jeff Immelt shares his thoughts on leadership and the evolving role of leaders, the Korporate Klimber pays attention.

Here’s what Jeff wrote recently |

[Recently], Aon Hewitt named GE the #1 company for developing leaders. They are an HR consulting company, so their designation means a lot. GE always ranks near the top of the list, but it is nice to be #1. A few days earlier, the Hay Group, another HR consulting firm, named GE #2 on its list of best companies for leadership.

The ratings are based on: practices and culture; global development; business and leadership strategy; reputation; and financial performance. GE tends to do well across all of the categories … that is one of our strengths.

One of the reasons GE has endured as a respected company is our commitment to leadership. However, I have always believed that “leadership has no shelf life.” In other words, as times change, techniques and emphasis must change as well. In our volatile world, leadership must adapt.

Great leaders embrace change. You, as an aspiring leader, should never accept the status quo or the phrase “Well, this is how it’s always been done.” People who say that will never become leaders. Change in inevitable. Success requires us to not only embrace the idea of change, but also that one become an agent for change.

Jeff goes on to say |

So let’s start with the elements of leadership that stand the test of time: a commitment to performance, a foundation of integrity and a desire to learn. These have been traits of good GE leaders for more than 100 years. They will – they must – never change. And, we stand by these foundations in good times and bad.

Pay attention. This is important.

Commitment to performance – You’ve got to work hard. There’s no way around it. No shortcuts. No “hacks”. But notice that he says “commitment to performance” not commitment to hard work. This means that it’s the end result i.e. the quality of the product you deliver that determines the quality of your performance. And as we all know, every high quality product requires hard work and attention to detail.

Foundation of integrity – Success without integrity will not last. Just look at Elliot Spitzer. He was the best attorney general that New York state ever had. He became governor. He was going to be the next president of the United States. Then, he gets caught for hiring prostitutes. This guy, who was the poster child for upholding the law, does something illegal. He lost his integrity. He lost the trust of those who put him up on a pedestal.

If success is built on relationships, and if relationships require trust, then how can one be successful without integrity?

Do the right thing. Always.

Desire to learn – The world is changing and so are the requirements of the workplace. Many of the skills that were important to succeed at a job just a decade ago are obsolete today. Adapt or become irrelevant. Learning and knowing new things, keeps you relevant.

No one likes stale potato chips. Keep yourself fresh. Never stop learning.

Here’s Jeff again |

But leadership must evolve with the times. Let me describe three aspects of leadership that are vastly different today than when I was growing up in the company.

Today, leaders must be deep first and broad second. The emphasis on a “general leader” is declining. Domain matters. Our best leaders have great instincts for markets, customers, data. General leaders can do ok for 2 or 3 years. Domain leaders build ideas that last.

Today, leaders must be risk managers not control freaks. I grew up in a controls-based company. But, the environment was easier. Good leaders today manage the 3-4 things that really count; they know how to prioritize.

Today, purpose is more important than process. In the past, we were more of a process-oriented company. Doing things the right way is still important today. However, in this slow-growth world, outcomes for our customers matter most. Leaders must have a passion for winning.

Passion for winning! You’ve already got that. That’s why you’re reading this blog and this article. Otherwise you’d be going through slides of top 10 twerkers in Romania or something.

Now all you need to do is develop the other skills.

Keep Klimbing.

 

Lateral thinking and 6 new shortcuts to success

Success. Perception vs. Reality

It took the oil tycoon John D. Rockefeller 46 years to make a billion dollars. Starting with a single oil refinery in 1863, and over two decades, he painstakingly built an empire.

Seventy years later, Michael Dell [of Dell computers] achieved billionaire status in 14 years. Bill Gates did it in 12. Facebook founder Mark Zukerberg, at the age of 23, became a billionaire in 3 years. Groupon’s Andew Mason did it in two.

How is it that some among us can build eBay in the time it takes the rest of us to build a house? Because most of us follow the same old pre-prescribed paths to achieve success as our parents did and their parents before them. We work hard. However, certain successful innovators break convention to find better routes to stunning accomplishments. They don’t work harder. They work differently.

They utilize lateral thinking.

Shane Snow is a serial entrepreneur and skilled journalist. His book Smartcuts: How Hackers, Innovators, and Icons Accelerate Success delves into reasons why some people are able to achieve incredible success in implausibly short time frames. He then goes on to show how each of us can use these “smartcuts” to to accelerate our success. According to Snow,

“Lateral Thinking is the process of solving problems via different angles than you might expect. It doesn’t happen when you do more of the same thing. So just simply working harder may not accomplish a goal like rethinking the approach you’re taking. Lateral thinking is about getting in the mindset of breaking the rules that aren’t really rules; they’re just the way things have been conventionally done in the past.”

Snow recently talked to Eric Barker of blog site Barking up the Wrong Tree and shared six strategies to help us get better, faster. Here’s an excerpt:

1) Forget “Paying Your Dues”

If paying your dues was essential, there would be no child prodigies or Zuckerberg billionaires.

“In all sorts of industries, what you see is that the fastest risers and the most successful are often not the ones with the most experience. What the patterns show is that people who tend to switch tracks, switch from different ladders or different careers, end up amassing more skills and more flexibility and more of this critical, lateral thinking that allows them to make breakthroughs and surpass their peers a lot faster than others.”

Often when people talk about the importance of paying dues, they’re afraid of failure or afraid of breaking rules. Playing it safe can help you do “pretty good” — but it’s rarely the way to get to the very top or to get there fast.

So go ahead, shake up that old stoic corporate culture. Don’t sit around in your department, waiting for your boss to retire so you can get promoted to his role. Instead, take some risks at your job. Do things differently. Get noticed and get promoted to be the boss of another department.

2) Find Your Yoda Outside The Office

Snow’s research found that formal mentorship didn’t work. That top lady exec they assign to guide you at the office? Zero effect on your career.

But the mentors you seek out on your own? Boom. They take you to the next level in a big way. But what’s the difference between the two?

Mentors need to care about you. Here’s Snow:

“Good mentors don’t just guide your practice, they guide your journey. They care about you and where your life goes. They are with you for the long haul. They are willing to say, ‘No,’ and to tell you what you’re doing is wrong. Those kinds of relationships yield outsized results in terms of future salaries and happiness.”

And caring goes both ways. If you don’t feel a bond with your mentor and you don’t open up, you won’t get the most from them. You need to care about them too.

“An organic mentorship is built around friendship and vulnerability. You need to be open about what you’re scared about and what you’re going through. Good mentors don’t just guide your practice, they guide your journey. This is the thing that you see in Star Wars and in the Karate Kid.”

So, go “wax on, wax off” an old Japanese man’s cars. Find a teacher who you care about and who cares about you and you’re not just on your way to a great career, you’re on your way to a primo life.

3) Watching Others Fail Helps You Succeed

Seeing others screw up helps you learn. It’s a shortcut to getting around a little known cognitive bias Snow discovered in his research.

When surgeons tried to learn a new procedure, which ones improved the most? The ones who saw others make mistakes.

“Surgeons who did successful surgeries tended to continue to improve, but surgeons that sucked at the surgery got even worse. And if you saw your buddy succeed at a surgery, it didn’t help you at all. But, paradoxically, if you saw your buddy fail at a surgery, you actually got better.”

Huh? So unless you’re good from day one the only way to get better was to watch other people fail? Why?

Because your brain is trying to stop you from feeling bad about yourself. So it lies to you.

When you screw up, you make excuses. “Not my fault. Sun was in my eyes.” When you see someone else do well, you say, “Well, of course, I’d do it just like that.”

But when you see someone else bomb you say “Whoa, better not do that.”

It’s one of the fundamental differences between the beginner and the expert mindset. Beginners need encouragement so they don’t quit. But experts love negative feedback. That’s the secret to how you keep improving.

4) Forget First Movers. Be A Fast Follower.

“I had that idea but they beat me to it.” Ever said that? Okay, you’re now officially a whiner. Because you were dead wrong.

You were actually in the better spot. Research shows the guy who starts second is more likely to win. Facebook wasn’t the first social network. MySpace came before that. In fact, it wasn’t even the second. But it is undisputedly the most successful. Similarly, Google began when Yahoo, Altavista and other search engines were immensely successful and popular. Now, most of us can’t live without Google.

When you’re first you have to waste a lot of time and energy figuring out best practices. When you’re second, you can just play “follow the leader.”

Instead of spending all your time trying to get better, work hard on studying and emulating those who are better than you.

Timing isn’t as big a deal as you thought and you can learn from those who came before you. Look around your company. Around your office. There are so many established processes that waste time and cost your company money. How many approvals does it take to submit a purchase order? Is someone doing it better or faster? Study them. Learn. Replicate. Succeed.

Then repeat.

You’re not too late. You’re right on time.

5) Want To Be More Creative? Add Constraints.

When you have limitations you can’t take the easy route. Constraints force you to think. And often, unless forced, we don’t think much at all.

When challenged, we have to be original.

“Constraints … give us boundaries that direct our focus and allow us to be more creative. This is why tiny startup companies frequently come up with breakthrough ideas. They start with so few resources that they’re forced to come up with simplifying solutions.”

So don’t bitch about how you don’t get the freedom to be creative at your job. You need the constraints. Change your view. Don’t look at them as roadblocks. Instead they are merely bumps that you need to figure out how to get around. Constraints help you become even more creative.

6) “It’s Easier To Make Something 10 Times Better Than To Make Something 10% Better”

That line is from Astro Teller, head of Google X. Those are the guys who build driverless cars and other supercool stuff.

When you try to make something 10% better, your brain is burdened with all the baggage that came before. You have no room to maneuver.

When you say 10 times better, you have to reinvent the whole process. It makes you think big. You toss out the old rules and start fresh. Here’s Shane:

“If you’re aiming for 10% improvement you are going to work within the conventional bounds of what normally happens in your product or industry. If you say that this has to be 10 times better, then it forces you to get down to the first principle of what is most essential. This is a way to force reinvention, which is really what innovation is.”

And when you dream big, people want to join you. Your co-workers talk about you. Senior leaders want to throw money at you to groom you as a future leader. Ambition is a force multiplier. When you think 10x instead of 10%, you behave differently.

Research shows when you set bolder, more audacious goals you work harder than when you’re reasonable. According to Shane:

“Subconsciously, we actually push ourselves harder when we’re going after bigger, loftier, harder goals. Research shows people who set higher goals end up outperforming their peers or themselves because they push themselves harder or because they force themselves to find more creative, alternative, unconventional solutions to problems.”

So dream big. No, even bigger.

This piece originally appeared on Barking Up the Wrong Tree.

A wager…

Here’s the deal.

First, give me $1000.

Then, give me one name from ALL the people you know.

Now sit back and relax. From now on, you’ll get 10% of all their earnings. Forever. Month after month and year after year for the rest of their life. Guaranteed!

Who would you bet on?

Obviously you’ll want to pick the person who you’ve determined will be the most successful over the course of their life. But how do you pick? What criteria do you look for?

This question was posed by Warren Buffet to a group of graduating MBA students a few years ago. Warren Buffet has made a living from picking the right people. He is one of the richest people on the planet, not because he invents things or sells great products but because he bets on people. His business model is to find a company run by the right people, invest in it and let those people keep doing what they do. All the while collecting a small percentage in returns. By doing this, he’s built a company who’s stock is worth $210,500 per share (see BRK.A).

How does Buffet find his winners?

He looks at character. Specifically, there are three traits in a person’s character that lead to long-term sustainable success:  Intelligence, Energy & Integrity

Intelligence | It’s not the person with the highest grades or the best SAT scores that possesses the intelligence required for success. It’s much more simple. It’s having the ability to assess situations quickly and make decisions that maximize opportunity while minimizing negative impact. It’s  having adaptive intelligence. Adaptive intelligence, unlike I.Q. intelligence, is not inherent. It’s the ability to see the pole coming at you while you’re running and dodging just enough to avoid a full on blow but instead take a hit on your shoulders and keep running. It’s the ability to see the pattern before it fully emerges and adapt.

Energy | Energy is keeping yourself healthy and to develop a bias to action. People who have a tendency to take action over just thinking about taking action. It’s taking initiative even when the results are not too clear. It’s about having the physical vitality recover from a cold quickly and be back at work the next day to kick ass. It’s having the strength to mentally push yourself into action, to take on more than your share of the workload and a willingness to crush it every single day.

Integrity | This is the most important one of all. Seriously! Without integrity, the other two are worthless. In fact, they are dangerous. We all know that integrity means doing the right thing at all times and in all circumstances, whether or not anyone is watching. But in this case, it’s more than that. Integrity is about being true to yourself. It’s about formulating a set of values and beliefs and then ensuring that every action, every thought and every part of your life is geared to align with those values.

So, who do you bet on?

What if I told you that there was one person in the world that you know, who you can pick and for that person you don’t have to give me the $1000. More importantly, you will get to keep 100% of the income they earn over their lifetime.

That person, my Korporate Klimbing friends, is YOU.

How? you ask?

The great thing is that none of the three qualities described above are inherent. These are not qualities that successful people are born with. They are self-selected. Each of these qualities can be learned, developed and perfected.

Conor Neill, professor at the prestigious IESE Business School in Spain, gives us tools to get started on developing each of the characteristics above.

Tools for success

Build intelligence | Adaptive intelligence is not something one needs to be born with. The ability to think on your feet and to be able to “pivot” at the right time can be taught.

Write it down

Start by writing stuff down. Start a daily journal or diary. Spend five to ten minutes to write down the ideas you had today, the names of people you’ve met and describe the experiences you’ve had. By writing down ideas on a daily basis, six months from now, you won’t be the intelligence of one moment. Instead, you will have the accumulated intelligence of six months of ideas you’ve written down, of contacts you’ve made and of things you’ve learned. Write down your life. By documenting the learnings from your daily life, you will accumulate intelligence far beyond what you can get from mastering chess strategy or an MBA course.

Maximize energy | Deal with your day one step at a time. Focus your energy on small chunks of deliverables. Break large and complicated projects into small milestones that can be met quickly. High performance athletes don’t think about the finish line or the outcome at the end of the game. Instead, they focus on the next one minute, the next five minutes and what they have to accomplish in that small amount of time. Football quarterbacks focus on moving forward in inches and on moving ten yards at a time. They don’t focus on the outcome of the three hour game. They create short term goals and they meet them. Similarly, focus on the next task. Not on that deliverable due in three months.

Develop integrity | Integrity is a personal choice, an uncompromising and consistent commitment to honor your values and beliefs.

Do you know how a child spells love? T.I.M.E. List the top give things that you consider important to you. Your kids, your parents, your career, you hobbies etc. Now list the top five activities that take up most of your time. The five activities that fill up your calendar. Are they aligned? Most likely not.

The coherence between your time and your values is where integrity begins. So little of our time goes to the things that we mean to do. Integrity is spending your precious time on the things that matter to you. Each day, hundreds of tiny decisions are made on where you spend your time that are not aligned with your values. We find ourselves inadvertently spending hours on Facebook when we just meant to check in for a few mins. Time spent watching the latest reality show. Time spent on playing candy crush. More importantly, time spent on doing things for other people just to please them. Learn to say NO. Say no to the little temptations that suck your time away. The ones that distract you from the things that are important to you. Say no to the requests of others that are not aligned to your values. 

Each one of these characteristics can be developed. More importantly, by turning these into habits, you ensure that they become part of your life.

All it takes is discipline. And practice. Lots. Of. Practice.

Will you bet on yourself?

Bet onyourself

 

Mentors provide the “secret sauce” to career success

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As a professional navigating the corporate world, the importance of having mentors can’t be understated. Unfortunately, it is one of the most easily overlooked pieces of career management. Most of us are so busy being high performers that we forget the value of wisdom offered by those who’ve already been there and those who can guide us in ways we didn’t consider.

As a korporate klimber, you are not just a professional. You are a brand. You’re not just a businessman. YOU are a business. Man!

All successful and long-lasting businesses have a board of directors. Your mentors are your personal board of directors who are there to help you manage your brand (and your career). Having a good group of mentors is helpful when you come across challenges at work or are faced with important career decisions and when you need someone’s unbiased point of view.

Mentors help fill your knowledge gaps and provide opportunities to help your professional growth. A good mentor will make it comfortable for you to let down your guard, share your insecurities, and ask the ‘stupid’ questions we all have sometimes. A good mentor is also honest and unafraid to tell you hard truths about yourself and your work. She helps you navigate the politics of your organization or profession, and avoid the land mines. She pushes you to take risks and aim higher, and advocates for you when you’re not there.

As you seek to develop the mentor relationship here are some basics to consider

  • Don’t force it. But be persistent in showing continued interest in and respect for the mentor’s opinions
  • Cultivate more than one mentor
  • Look for mentors both in your department and outside
  • Look for mentors both inside your company and outside
  • Mentors don’t have to be in the same profession or field as you. Build relationships with people from different backgrounds
  • Don’t only focus on mentors that are older than you. Instead, put age aside and look for people who are successful in their fields and know more than you
  • Find someone you respect and someone who respects you back. The ultra popular frat brother who gave you wedgies but was soooo cool, should not be on your list
  • Don’t pick someone to be a mentor if you want or plan to work for them someday. A mentor should be viewed as long term guidance counselor, not your future boss
  • Choose wisely. Pick a reliable person who will “show up” when needed.

Successful people build relationships and gather intelligence from a wide variety of experts in all industries and age brackets. Insular people who are unwilling to leave their comfort zone become closed off from opportunities.

Mentors provide guidance and help you overcome challenges, both professional and personal. And if you’re really lucky, they will inspire you along the way.

Facebook COO shows young women how to be a Korporate Klimber

Recently, Facebook’s powerful COO Shery Sandberg answered 10 questions to Time magazine about how young, ambitious women can take control of their careers and rise to the top. She is the epitome of what Korporate Klimber is all about. She’s young. She’s ambitious. And she’s at the top. She has been ranked in Time’s 100 people influencing the world. In her book Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead she talks about how young women should approach the corporate world.

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What were you like in college?

I learned how to study. The first five-page paper I wrote was a project for our entire junior year [in high school]. In college I had to write five-page papers overnight.

You emphasize the importance of finding the right romantic partner. How are college women supposed to think about that?

Starting out evenly, even in college, is so important. It’s easy to fall into the girlfriend routine, like “I’ll do that laundry,” “Let me pick up that errand.” That’s nice the first month, but by the fifth year of marriage you’re gonna be sorry you did that.

What kind of ongoing gender imbalances do you see for women in entry-level jobs?

Who takes notes in a meeting? So often it’s the junior women. You can’t fully participate if you’re always taking notes. And by the way, the men who are your peers? They can take notes too.

What would you tell a young woman who feels stuck at the start of her career?

Look at jobs and think “I can,” not “I shouldn’t.” Apply for jobs, apply for opportunities, say that you can do things even when you’re not sure.

If you’re stuck picking up dry cleaning, what’s the best way to ask your boss to take you more seriously?

Say, “I love this company. I love this job. I am willing to do anything, because I’m that kind of person. I do want to make sure I’m progressing and taking on things that are going to challenge me more. Can you walk me through the things I need to demonstrate so I can earn more responsibility?”

What have been some of your biggest mistakes?

I wasn’t worried about having kids and a career, because I thought all women were going to have both. I think we’re smarter now, and we know how challenging it is. I got married young, when I really had no business getting married. I made lots of mistakes along the way.

What about smaller screwups?

When I was first at the World Bank, I put in the figures for a speech Larry Summers gave about girls’ education, and I got one country’s literacy rate totally wrong. The representative from that country called the president of the World Bank to complain. I was like, “In college when you get it wrong, they put a little red circle. But here if I get it wrong, this whole country is going to be insulted.” So I said I was sorry, and I started checking figures a lot more carefully.

Why do you think women are so afraid of making mistakes?

When men make mistakes, they don’t internalize it as their fault, so it doesn’t hurt them as much. Because gender makes us overestimate male performance and underestimate female performance, we have more tolerance for men’s mistakes.

How should college women balance exploring different interests with focusing on career goals?

It can be either, but you have to be explicit. Maybe you want to use college to do volunteer work, or get into grad school, or make lots of friends, or get a job in the business world. But don’t let life happen–make it happen.

 

via TIME

Getting emotional at the office

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Experts love talking about the benefits of effective networking and relationship management at the office to stay informed, build allies and grow your career. But most of them are clueless when it comes to teaching you the “how”.

The fact is, it’s deceptively simple!

Simple, because all you have to do is connect with people on an emotional level.

Deceptive, because … well … it’s not easy to “care” about other people.

But here’s why this is important – All the people we work with, no matter how professional or logical or high up the ladder they seem to be, make decisions (especially important ones) based on emotions of pride, vanity, jealousy, fear, optimism, confidence and friendship. Neuroscientists have proven that when it comes to decision-making, the brain unequivocally relies on emotion over intellect. Surely, you’ve heard of the “gut feeling…”

How do you leverage this knowledge to get ahead?

By getting personal with people at the office. Bond at an emotional level. Show interest in the well being of those you work with. Start with a simple “Hi. How is your day?”

Since their perception of you is driven by their feelings towards you, you can influence that perception by making them feel good about you. When you genuinely care about their well-being, you invariably get them to care about you. When they care about you, they will help you succeed.

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A word of caution …

a) Don’t fake it. Take genuine interest in others and their lives. People are not idiots. They can tell when you’re being a self-centered, superficial asshole!

b) Keep in mind that it’s about THEM. Not you. Don’t use the emotional connection you form to dump all your problems on them.

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Building relationships through emotional bonds, especially with those you work with, is a fundamental skill for career growth.

Why? Because everyone, even the part-time summer intern, can influence the path of your career. Manage the relationship and you manage their emotions. By managing their emotions, you manage how they influence your career.

 

Dale CarnegieWhen dealing with people, remember you not dealing with creatures of logic, but with creatures of emotion, creatures bristling with prejudices and motivated by pride and vanity.”

― Dale Carnegie, How to Win Friends and Influence People